FEMALE STATUETTE called Ibeji - Yoruba culture, Nigeria - First half of the 20th century

Frédéric Coridon

Description

FEMALE STATUETTE called Ibeji

Yoruba culture, Nigeria

First half of the 20th century

Wood, horn, and nail

H.: 31; L.: 12; Thickness: 8.5 cm

Anthropomorphic female monoxyle statuette standing, feet separated from each other resting on a circular base. His arms stylized in two large arcs come to rest on his hips. Her fingers are incised, as is her sex cache, which has geometric patterns. His umbilicus is in relief, adorned with radiating scarifications. She wears a choker necklace of fine brown horn beads and one of her pupils keeps her metal stud.

The head of the statuette has a darker and more brilliant patina, testimony to its use. His shell headdress is entirely incised while his temples and forehead have facial scarifications also engraved.

The Ibeji statuettes work in pairs: Taiwo and Kehinde are twins. These sculptures are the representation. They are considered important figures in daily life. Kept on an altar when they are not worn by women, they are given the same attention as the living: food, bath, prayers, clothing.

Bears the handwritten number “DJ128”.

Due to its treatment, this statuette could be stylistically compared to lot n°3 of the public auction presented at Giquello & Associés on April 22nd.

Text and photos © FCP CORIDON

Ref.LP: 2791

1600 €

Contact Frédéric Coridon

Frédéric Coridon
Marché Serpette
Stands 2 et 9 allée 3 Serpette
 +33681153179

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