Earthenware

There are two types of earthenware. The first one is the tin-glazed earthenware or majolica, a terra cotta covered with a tin-based glaze that gives it a white shiny finish. The other one is the fine earthenware, which displays an ivory color due to a lead-based glaze. In Middle East, earthenware was mastered as early as the 9th century, like Iznik earthenware for example. In the Middle-Ages earthenware spread throughout Europe, and many factories emerge in Delft, Rouen, Samson or Lille. Numerous workshops settled in Vallauris, like Grandjean-Jourdan, Robert Picault and Jerôme Massier. Some earthenware works are famous and present a great historical interest, like the productions from Bernard Palissy in the 16th century, which later inspired ceramists like Georges Pull (1810-1889) and Alfred Renoleau who created many “plats aux poissons” (fish plates) circa 1890. Earthenware is also widespread in Italy, with renowned names like Del Vecchio in Naples.

Price upon request
Earthenware, Charles X, Restoration, Louis Philippe, 19th century
Price upon request
Earthenware, Earthenware, 19th century
Price upon request
Earthenware, Earthenware, 19th century
8500 €
Earthenware, 19th century, Weapons factory of Sèvres
6500 €
Earthenware, Earthenware, 19th century
Price upon request
Earthenware, 19th century
Sold
Earthenware, Earthenware, Art nouveau, Art deco, 20th century
Sold