Adrienne Lebrun, Paul Bert Serpette as an evidence

Passionate about the early 20th century paintings, these are small pieces of art history that Adrienne Lebrun presents on her new booth. Freshly reinstalled at Paul Bert Serpette, this return to basics sounds obvious, as this market is part of this antique dealer professional identity. Come and discover this shimmering universe that will reserve a thousand and one emotions for you. 

What is your background ?

I have always had a great interest in the decorative arts. I was registered as a free auditor at the Ecole du Louvre and I arrived in the profession following a decoration project that had been entrusted to me, after a meeting with a gentleman who had just bought the property of Gunther Sachs in Gassin and who wanted to make it a luxury guest house. This fascinating project lasted 6 months and allowed me to rub shoulders with many Parisian antique dealers who instilled in me the profession and the knowledge related to the French Decorative Arts of the 18th century. When the site was finished, I wanted to continue. I entrusted my desire to settle down to Paul Bert Serpette to some antique dealers who supported me and this is how I was able to take off. I first stayed 4 years to finally go to the Louvre des Antiquaires and stay there 18 years. I then did a few years of break in my career then I had the desire to return in presenting something other than 18th century. I therefore relocated to Serpette in a booth that I coveted for a long time and which was offered to me by chance, it is perhaps a sign of destiny. Paul Bert Serpette is really part of my professional identity 

Tell us about your specialty

I have always been very interested in 20th century painting during which many new trends appeared, such as post-impressionism, cubism, abstraction or concrete art. I find this period particularly interesting because the artists worked a lot together and evolved in sharing their ideas. It's a very rich period, you just have to see the sky-high prices for the works! For my part, I am much more modest, I present those who are called the little masters, having participated in numerous exhibitions both in France and abroad, and for some of them appearing in museums like the Museum of Modern Art of the city of Paris. I also like sculpture, at this moment for example, I present a masterpiece of Sutter dating from 1925, which recalls the sculptures of Trocadéro.

What does Paul Bert Serpette represent for you?

Today in the art world, it is the only place in the world with such a qualitative grouping of goods. Paul Bert Serpette has a worldwide reputation. It is a melting pot of visitors, ranging from the biggest CEO to simpler amateur. I am very happy to be able to bring the painting of the 20th century to this market because very few antique dealers represent it.

What is your favorite piece of the moment?

Right now, I have a crush on this painting by Jan Meyer which is one of my last acquisitions. He is a painter who belongs to the lyrical abstraction movement. He attended the academy of fine arts of 'Amsterdam and arrived in France in the 1950s, where he rubbed shoulders with artists like Lucio Fontana, Yves Klein, Karel Appel and Dmitrienko. His gesture was swift, he unleashed the tubes of paint with great stabs and crushed the pasta on the canvas homogeneously. I really like this work because it is all in material and has in its black, magnificent shades of brown. I would take it well under my arm to go hang it at home…