Celadon

From October 06, 2022
Nathalie Dupuis stands 130 and 132 alley 1 Paul Bert

Celadon, “quingci” in Chinese, literally means “green porcelain”. This enamel, characterized by its jade green hue, appeared in China from the 3rd century AD. Its discovery by the potters of Yue, renowned for their tea bowls, was the result of incredible chance. Its formula then spread throughout the Asian continent.

From the tenth century, with the Song potters, celadon is compared to sacred jade, so impressive is the refinement of these blue-green, milky and opalescent glazes. This enamel attracts for its infinite variation of materials, colors or sparkles, more or less clear and translucent. To evoke it, the Asians call it "sublime in the sky", "green clouds caught in a whirlwind of ice" or "the color of the sky after the rain".

Emblem of Asia, it entered the history of ceramics like a myth.

Celadon reached France thanks to Théodore Deck (1823-1891), who was the first to seize it. Fascinated by Chinese ceramics, he finds this glaze and uses it through the eclectic taste of his time.

The craze for this enamel still continues with great contemporary ceramists such as Claude Champy, Jean-François Fouilloux, Jean Girel, Marc Uzan, Marie-Laure Guerrier, as well as many others. These artists express themselves through what Claude Champy calls “a possible link between the sky and the sea”.

This exhibition shows, through a few pieces, how this ceramic technique, which dates back to ancient China, has stood the test of time and still arouses creative power. Indeed, thanks to its beauty and its poetry, it fascinates many contemporary artists.

“I would so much like to find a small space in this mythology (…). Celadon couldn't have stopped a thousand years ago. We must try to extend it, it brings so many possibilities. (Claude Champy)

Artists presented: Benoit Pouplard, Christine Ladeveze, Claude Champy, Jean-François Fouilhoux, Xavier Durosselle, Masamichi Yoshikowa

Collaboration: Alexi Mostini, Biron Market

Address

stands 130 and 132 alley 1 Paul Bert